Friday, July 6, 2012

Little Mexican Chairs

Many of you have seen this sweet yellow children's chair in my studio...I have had since at least my late 20's. And yes, this was even before I was a dollmaker!  Was there ever such a time??

It just speaks to me...I love rustic pieces, art and rustic-style food ...I guess I like the ease of it...created from the heart but oh so endearing (food- oh so good).

Side note: Food- one of my favorite chefs is Jamie Oliver...although he does not gear towards Mexican he has great rustic-style recipes...link here...and ok- how can you not love a guy, from the UK, who is trying to help our (yes- US) kids with learning to eat healthy?

mexican street salad
this recipe here
grilled peach salad with bresaola and a creamy dressing
this recipe here

So back to little rustic chairs...I have this spot above our built in armoire...and I have always wanted to put little chairs in that area...I brought my little yellow chair home from my studio not with the intention of that space but after a few days I realized it was a perfect fit! And now Issy will have something to look at while she is up there!

And I would like to have three..so my search has begun...I found this one on ebay and it looks to be the same era of mine...so BID (actually, I made an offer)...WIN (accepted)...PAY and now waiting for it to arrive. I think the third one I will hunt down at flea market-antique stores...and what would life be without the thrill of the hunt!
ok...so little chairs are not totally "collector" items..but I love them and isn't that all that matters in a collection!?!

 History

The relationship between Spain and Mexico can be identified in nearly every aspect of Mexican culture. Mexican hand-crafted furniture was so valued that in 1568, a carpenter's guild was established by the Spanish in Mexico City. Being a guild member required a high degree of craftsmanship, ensuring quality pieces. Native "carpentieros" established smaller guilds outside larger cities in order to further their trade.

Materials

Carpentieros used wood that was native to the region in Mexico where they lived. Mesquite, a dark wood found in the Sonoran Desert in northern Mexico, is used for its durability and hardness. Sabino, a lighter, golden-colored wood, was found in the swampy wet plateau regions of Mexico. Both mesquite and sabino have insect-repellant properties. Spanish cypress, heart pine, and walnut are also used in Mexican furniture.

Significance

 To own a genuine piece of Mexican furniture is to own a piece of historic functional artwork. Traditional Mexican furniture craftsmanship and style have had an impact on furniture styles across the world, as well as furniture production
Read more here from ehow

2 comments:

  1. I can't believe they aren't still making this style of child's chair.

    How do you find some place online to get one of these? I mean, did you Google "little Mexican chairs" or...? Thanks for your time.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes, I did Google Children's Mexican chairs, small Mexican chairs, 1940's children's Mexican chair, Antique Mexican Folk Art Hand Painted Chair, Vintage Mexican chair...anything that would lead me to it...Ebay will show the best selection. I would pay between $15 and $40 for ones with spindled turned wood legs and backs.

    ReplyDelete

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